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04.09 Turbine calculations Click here. 100 2

Entropy Balances: Solving for Turbine Efficiency Sample Calculation. (uakron.edu, 10min) Steam turbines are very common in power generation cycles. Knowing how to compute the actual work, reversible work, and compare them is an elementary part of any engineering thermodynamics course.

Comprehension Questions:

1. An adiabatic turbine is supplied with steam at 2.0 MPa and 600°C and it exhausts at 98% quality and 24°C. (a) Compute the work output per kg of steam.(b) Compute the efficiency of the turbine.

2. A Rankine cycle operates on steam exiting the boiler at 7 MPa and 550°C and expanding to 60°C and 98% quality. Compute the efficiency of the turbine.

02.01 Expansion/Contraction Work Click here. 100 2

Vocabulary in Sections 2.1-2.3: Forms of "Work." (uakron.edu, 11 min) Making cookies is hard work. In discussing work, we develop several shorthand terms to refer to specific common situations: expansion-contraction work, shaft work, flow work, stirring work, "lost" work. These terms comprise the headings of sections 2.1-2.3, but it is convenient to discuss them all at once. The important thing to remember is that work is really just force times distance, pure and simple. The shorthand terms are not intended to complicate the discussion, but to expedite the analysis of the energy balance. Developing some familiarity with the terms related to common daily experiences may help you to assimilate this new vocabulary.

Comprehension Questions:
1. How is "expansion-contraction" work related to force times distance?
2. What is the expression for "flow" work? Explain how it relates to force times distance for fluid flowing in a pipe.
3. What expression can we use for calculating "shaft" work, as in a pump or turbine? What is the technique of calculus to which it is related?

10.02 - Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) Calculations Click here. 100 2

VLE Routines - General Strategies (4:49) (msu.edu)

Deciding which routine to use is more challenging than it appears. Also understanding the strategy used to solve the problems is extremely helpful in being able to develop the equations to solve instead of trying to memorize them.

05.4 - Refrigeration Click here. 100 2

Refrigeration Cycle Introduction (LearnChemE.com, 3min) explains each step in an ordinary vapor compression (OVC) refrigeration cycle and the energy balance for the step. You might also enjoy the more classical introduction (USAF, 11min) representing your tax dollars at work. The musical introduction is quite impressive and several common misconceptions are addressed near the end of the video.
Comprehension Questions: Assume zero subcooling and superheating in the condenser and evaporator.
1. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. Why is the condenser temperature higher than than the evaporator temperature? Shouldn't it be the other way around? Explain.
2. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using the table in Appendix E-12.
3. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using the chart in Appendix E-12.
4. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using Eqn 2.47.
5. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. Assume the compressor of the OVC cycle is adiabatic and reversible. What two variables (P,V,T,U,H,S) determine the state at the outlet of the compressor?

11.02 - Calculations with Activity Coefficients Click here. 100 4

Dew Temperature (7:57) (msu.edu)

The culmination of the activity coefficient method is application of the fitted activity coefficients to extrapolate from limited experiments in a Stage III calculation. The recommended order of study is 1) Bubble Pressure; 2) Bubble Temperature; 3) Dew Pressure; 4) Dew Temperature. Note that an entire Txy diagram can be generated with bubble temperature calculations; no dew calculations are required. However, many applications require dew calculations, so they cannot be avoided. The dew calculations are more complicated than bubble calculations, because the liquid activity coefficients are not known until the unknown liquid mole fractions are found. This screencast describes the procedure and how to implement the method in Matlab or Excel.

07.06 Solving The Cubic EOS for Z Click here. 100 1

5. Peng Robinson Using Solver for PVT and Vapor Pressure - Excel (4:42) (msu.edu)

Describes use of the Goal Seek and Solver tools for Peng-Robinson PVT properties and vapor pressure.

Comprehension Questions:

1. Which of the following represents the vapor pressure for argon at 100K?
(a) 3.000 bars (b) 4.000 bars (c) 3.26903 bars.

08.02 - The Internal Energy Departure Function Click here. 100 2

The Internal Energy Departure Function (11min, uakron.edu) Deriving departure functions for a variety of equations of state is simplified by transforming to dimensionless units and using density instead of volume. This also leads to an extra simplification for the internal energy departure function.

Comprehension Questions:

1. What is the value of T(∂P/∂T)V - P for an ideal gas?
2. What is the value of (∂U/∂V)T for an ideal gas and how can you explain this result at the molecular scale?
3. The Redlich-Kwong (RK) EOS is: P=RT/(V-b) -a/(V2RT1.5). Use Eqn. 8.13 to solve for (U-Uig)/RT of the RK EOS.
4. The RK EOS can be written as: Z = 1/(1-) - /(RT1.5). Use Eqn. 8.14 to solve for (U-Uig)/RT of the RK EOS.

05.2 - The Rankine cycle Click here. 100 1

Rankine Cycle Introduction (LearnChemE.com, 4min) The Carnot cycle becomes impractical for common large scale application, primarily because H2O is the most convenient working fluid for such a process. When working with H2O, an isentropic turbine could easily take you from a superheated region to a low quality steam condition, essentially forming large rain drops. To understand how this might be undesirable, imagine yourself riding through a heavy rain storm at 60 mph with your head outside the window. Now imagine doing it 24/7/365 for 10 years; that's how long a high-precision, maximally efficient turbine should operate to recover its price of investment. Next you might ask why not use a different working fluid that does not condense, like air or CO2. The main problem is that the heat transfer coefficients of gases like these are about 40 times smaller that those for boiling and condensing H2O. That means that the heat exchangers would need to be roughly 40 times larger. As it is now, the cooling tower of a nuclear power plant is the main thing that you see on the horizon when approaching from far away. If that heat exchanger was 40 times larger... that would be large. And then we would need a similar one for the nuclear core. Power cycles based on heating gases do exist, but they are for relatively small power generators.
     With this background, it may be helpful to review the relation between the Carnot and Rankine cycles. (LearnChemE.com, 6min) The Carnot cycle is an idealized conceptual process in the sense that it provides the maximum possible fractional conversion of heat into work (aka. thermal efficiency, ηθ).
Comprehension Questions:
1. Why is the Carnot cycle impractical when it comes to running steam through a turbine? How does the Rankine cycle solve this problem?
2. Why is the Carnot cycle impractical when it comes to running steam through a pump? How does the Rankine cycle solve this problem?
3. It is obvious which temperatures are the "high" and "low" temperatures in the Carnot cycle, but not so much in the Rankine cycle. The "boiler" in a Rankine cycle actually consists of "simple boiling" where the saturated liquid is converted to saturated vapor, and superheating where the saturated vapor is raised to the temperature entering the turbine. When comparing the thermal efficiency of a Rankine cycle to the Carnot efficiency, should we substitute the temperature during "simple" boiling, or the temperature entering the turbine into the formula for the Carnot efficiency? Explain.

11.02 - Calculations with Activity Coefficients Click here. 100 3

Bubble Temperature (2:43) (msu.edu)

The culmination of the activity coefficient method is application of the fitted activity coefficients to extrapolate from limited experiments in a Stage III calculation. The bubble temperature is the easiest after bubble pressure. The recommended order of study is 1) Bubble Pressure; 2) Bubble Temperature; 3) Dew Pressure; 4) Dew Temperature. Note that an entire Txy diagram can be generated with bubble temperature calculations; no dew calculations are required.

17.07 - Temperature Dependence of Ka Click here. 100 2

Example 17.4 and 17.5 solved using Kcalc.xlsx (6:01) (msu.edu)

The full form of the temperature dependence of Ka is implemented in Kcalc.xlsx and Kcalc.m. This screecast covers the use of Kcalc.xlsx for Example 17.4 and Example 17.5 of the textbook.

Comprehension Questions:

1. CO and H2 are fed in a 2:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGRº and ΔHRº.
2. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGRº and ΔHRº.
3. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 600K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGRº and ΔHRº.
4. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGTº and ΔHTº. Check your answer for ΔGTº using the value given for Ka in Example 17.1.
5. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 600K and 10 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate Ka, ΔGTº and ΔHTº.
6. CH3OH is fed to a reactor at 200ºC and 1 bar with a catalyst that produces CO and H2. Calculate Ka, ΔGTº and ΔHTº for this reaction and compare to the literature values given in Example 17.6 of Section 17.10.
7. CH3OH is fed to a reactor at 300ºC and 1 bar with a catalyst that produces CO and H2. Calculate Ka for this reaction and compare to the value given in Example 17.6 of Section 17.10. Give two reasons why the two estimates are not identical.




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