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17.07 - Temperature Dependence of Ka Click here. 100 2

Example 17.4 and 17.5 solved using Kcalc.xlsx (6:01) (msu.edu)

The full form of the temperature dependence of Ka is implemented in Kcalc.xlsx and Kcalc.m. This screecast covers the use of Kcalc.xlsx for Example 17.4 and Example 17.5 of the textbook.

Comprehension Questions:

1. CO and H2 are fed in a 2:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGRº and ΔHRº.
2. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGRº and ΔHRº.
3. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 600K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGRº and ΔHRº.
4. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGTº and ΔHTº. Check your answer for ΔGTº using the value given for Ka in Example 17.1.
5. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 600K and 10 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate Ka, ΔGTº and ΔHTº.
6. CH3OH is fed to a reactor at 200ºC and 1 bar with a catalyst that produces CO and H2. Calculate Ka, ΔGTº and ΔHTº for this reaction and compare to the literature values given in Example 17.6 of Section 17.10.
7. CH3OH is fed to a reactor at 300ºC and 1 bar with a catalyst that produces CO and H2. Calculate Ka for this reaction and compare to the value given in Example 17.6 of Section 17.10. Give two reasons why the two estimates are not identical.




10.02 - Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) Calculations Click here. 100 2

VLE Routines - General Strategies (4:49) (msu.edu)

Deciding which routine to use is more challenging than it appears. Also understanding the strategy used to solve the problems is extremely helpful in being able to develop the equations to solve instead of trying to memorize them.

14.09 - Numerical procedures for binary, ternary LLE Click here. 100 1

LLE Calculations: UNIFAC from Actcoeff.xlsx Calculation of LLE. (5 min) (LearnChemE.com)
See also - Supplement on Iteration of LLE with Excel and Matlab. Hints on converging LLE using Excel with the method presented in the textbook. For details, see

08.07 - Implementation of Departure Functions Click here. 100 1

Derive the internal energy departure function (uakron.edu, 20min) for the following EOS:
P = (RT(1+V1.5)/V1.5)*(1+sqrt(V)) - a/(V^2T^1.3)/(1+sqrt(V)) This sample derivation is more complicated than average, but the usual procedure still works. We begin by rearranging to obtain an expression for Z and finding the Helmholtz departure, then differentiating to get the internal energy.

Comprehension: Given (A-Aig)TV/RT = -2ln(1-ηP) - 16.49ηPβε/[1-βε(1-2ηP)/(1+2ηP)^2 ]

1. Derive the internal energy departure function.

2. Derive the expression for the compressibility factor.

3. Solve the EOS for Zc.

04.09 Turbine calculations Click here. 100 2

Entropy Balances: Solving for Turbine Efficiency Sample Calculation. (uakron.edu, 10min) Steam turbines are very common in power generation cycles. Knowing how to compute the actual work, reversible work, and compare them is an elementary part of any engineering thermodynamics course.

Comprehension Questions:

1. An adiabatic turbine is supplied with steam at 2.0 MPa and 600°C and it exhausts at 98% quality and 24°C. (a) Compute the work output per kg of steam.(b) Compute the efficiency of the turbine.

2. A Rankine cycle operates on steam exiting the boiler at 7 MPa and 550°C and expanding to 60°C and 98% quality. Compute the efficiency of the turbine.

17.07 - Temperature Dependence of Ka Click here. 100 2

You can customize Kcalc.xlsx (uakron.edu, 17min) to facilitate whatever calculations you may need to perform. This presentation shows how to implement VLOOKUP to automatically load the relevant Hf, Gf, and Cp values. It also shows how to automatically use the Cp/R value when a,b,c,d values for Cp are not available. Finally, it shows how a fairly general table of inlet flows, temperatures, and pressures can be used to set up the equilibrium conversion calculation. The initial set up is demonstrated for the dimethyl ether process, then revised to initiate solution of Example 17.9 for ammonia synthesis.

Comprehension Questions:

1. The video shows how the shortcut Van't Hof equation can be written as lnKa=A+B/T. What are the values of A and B for the dimethyl ether process when a reference temperature of 633K is used?
2. The video shows how the shortcut Van't Hof equation can be written as lnKa=A+B/T. What are the values of A and B for the ammonia synthesis process when a reference temperature of 600K is used?

14.09 - Numerical procedures for binary, ternary LLE Click here. 100 1

LLE flash using Matlab/Chap14/LLEflash.m (5:54) (msu.edu)

An overview of the LLE flash routine in Matlab, including an overview of the program logic and then an example of how to run the program.

See also - Supplement on Iteration of LLE with Excel and Matlab.

07.06 Solving The Cubic EOS for Z Click here. 100 1

6. Solving for density (uakron.edu, 9min) An alternative to solving directly for Z is to solve for density then compute Z=P/(ρRT). This requires iterative solution and it is not very expedient for repetitive calculations, but it requires no rearrangement of the EOS and it is easy to visualize. This sample calculation is illustrated here for the vdW EOS, solving for the density of propane as: (a) liquid 25C,11bars (b) liquid 62C,35bars (c) vapor at 80C and 30bars.

Comprehension Questions:

1. Solve for the liquid density (mol/cm3) of n-pentane at 62C and 2.5 bars using the vdW EOS.
2. Solve for the Z-factor of liquid n-pentane at 62C and 2.5 bars using the vdW EOS.
3. What's the value of the Z-factor at 80C and 30 bars according to this presentation?

05.4 - Refrigeration Click here. 100 2

Refrigeration Cycle Introduction (LearnChemE.com, 3min) explains each step in an ordinary vapor compression (OVC) refrigeration cycle and the energy balance for the step. You might also enjoy the more classical introduction (USAF, 11min) representing your tax dollars at work. The musical introduction is quite impressive and several common misconceptions are addressed near the end of the video.
Comprehension Questions: Assume zero subcooling and superheating in the condenser and evaporator.
1. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. Why is the condenser temperature higher than than the evaporator temperature? Shouldn't it be the other way around? Explain.
2. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using the table in Appendix E-12.
3. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using the chart in Appendix E-12.
4. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using Eqn 2.47.
5. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. Assume the compressor of the OVC cycle is adiabatic and reversible. What two variables (P,V,T,U,H,S) determine the state at the outlet of the compressor?

17.06 Determining the Spontaneity of Reactions Click here. 100 1

Which way will a reaction go? (3:40) (msu.edu)

When both reactants and products are present in a reactng mixture, the direction the reaction will proceed is not necessarily indicated by the sign of ΔGo or Ka. Rather, it is determined by ΔG. This screencasts provides guidance for understanding this concept.

Comprehension Questions: (Hint: review Example 17.1 before answering.)

1. CO and H2 are fed in a 2:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of H2 is 32%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?
2. CO and H2 are fed in a 2:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of CO is 52%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?
3. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of H2 is 42%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?
4. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of H2 is 42%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?

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