Top-rated ScreenCasts

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09.05 - Fugacity and Fugacity Coefficient Click here. 100 1

What is fugacity? (10min) (learncheme.com) Defines fugacity in terms of Gibbs Energy and describes the need for defining this new property as a generalization of how pressure affects ideal gases.
Comprehension Questions
1. The phases in this video start with concentrations 0.0007kg/L and 1.0 kg/L, when not at equilibrium. What are the equilibrium concentrations?
2. Why is concentration an unreliable indicator for the direction of mass transfer?
3. Name two indicators for the direction of mass transfer that are superior to concentration.  

14.09 - Numerical procedures for binary, ternary LLE Click here. 100 1

LLE flash using Matlab/Chap14/LLEflash.m (5:54) (msu.edu)

An overview of the LLE flash routine in Matlab, including an overview of the program logic and then an example of how to run the program.

See also - Supplement on Iteration of LLE with Excel and Matlab.

10.07 - Nonideal Systems Click here. 100 1

This screencast shows how to quickly visualize Pxy phase diagrams for nonideal systems using Excel (5min, uakron.edu). These sample calculations for methanol+benzene apply the simplest nonideal solution model: ΔHmix = A12*x1*x2. Rigors of this model are discussed in Chapter 11. Nevertheless, its basic elements are simple enough that they can be understood in Chapter 10. When x1=0 or x2=0, a pure fluid is indicated, corresponding to no mixing and zero heat of mixing. When A12=0, the ideal solution approximation is recovered. When A12>0, the model indicates an endothermic interaction (like 2-propanol+water, Fig. 10.8c), giving rise to "positive deviations from Raoult's Law." When A12<0, the model indicates an exothermic interaction (like acetone+chloroform, Fig. 10.9c), giving rise to "negative deviations from Raoult's Law." With this spreadsheet, you can quickly change your components and A12 values to see how the phase diagram changes and gain "hands-on" familiarity with the principles discussed in Section 10.7. 

Note: This is a companion file in a series. You may wish to choose your own order for viewing them. For example, you should implement the first three videos before implementing this one. Also, you might like to see how to quickly visualize the Txy analog of the Pxy phase diagram. If you see a phase diagram like the ones in section 11.8, you might want to learn about LLE phase diagrams. The links on the software tutorial present a summary of the techniques to be implemented throughout Unit3 in a quick access format that is more compact than what is presented elsewhere. Some students may find it helpful to refer to this compact list when they find themselves "not being able to find the forest because of all the trees."

Comprehension Questions:
1. Make a Pxy diagram for cyclohexane+toluene at 80C and A12=200. What kind of system is this?
2. Make a Pxy diagram for cyclohexane+benzene at 80C and A12=200. What kind of system is this?
3. Why does the system's qualitative behavior change so much when the components and model parameters are changed so little?

10.08 - Concepts for Generalized Phase Equilibria Click here. 100 1

Concepts for General Phase Equilibria (12:33) (msu.edu)

The calculus used in Chapter 6 needs to be generalized to add composition dependence. Also, we introduce partial molar properties and composition derivatives that are not partial molar properties. We introduce chemical potential These concepts are used to show that the chemical potentials and component fugacities are used as criteria for phase equilibria.

05.2 - The Rankine cycle Click here. 100 1

Thermal Efficiency with a 1-Stage Rankine Cycle. (uakron.edu, 12min) Steam from a boiler enters a turbine at 350C and 1.2MPa and exits at 0.01MPa and saturated vapor; compute the thermal efficiency (ηθ) of the Rankine cycle based on this turbine. (Note that this is something quite different from the turbine's "expander" efficiency, ηE.) This kind of calculation is one of the elementary skills that should come out of any thermodynamics course. Try to pause the video often and work out the answer on your own whenever you think you can. You will learn much more about the kinds of mistakes you might make if you take your best shot, then use the video to check yourself. Then practice some more by picking out other boiler and condenser conditions and turbine efficiencies. FYI: the conditions of this problem should look familiar because they are the same as the turbine efficiency example in Chapter 4. That should make it easy for you to take your best shot.

Comprehension Questions:

1. The entropy balance is cited in this video, but never comes into play. Why not?

2. Steam from a boiler enters a turbine at 400C and 2.5 MPa and exits a 100% efficient turbine at 0.025MPa; compute the Rankine efficiency. Comment on the practicality of this process. (Hint: review Chapter 4 if you need help with turbine efficiency.)

11.02 - Calculations with Activity Coefficients Click here. 100 3

Bubble Temperature (2:43) (msu.edu)

The culmination of the activity coefficient method is application of the fitted activity coefficients to extrapolate from limited experiments in a Stage III calculation. The bubble temperature is the easiest after bubble pressure. The recommended order of study is 1) Bubble Pressure; 2) Bubble Temperature; 3) Dew Pressure; 4) Dew Temperature. Note that an entire Txy diagram can be generated with bubble temperature calculations; no dew calculations are required.

01.6 Summary Click here. 100 1

The objectives for Chapter 1 were:

1. Explain the definitions and relations between temperature, molecular kinetic energy,
molecular potential energy and macroscopic internal energy, including the role of intermolecular potential energy and how it is modeled. Explain why the ideal gas internal energy
depends only on temperature.
2. Explain the molecular origin of pressure.
3. Apply the vocabulary of thermodynamics with words such as the following: work, quality,
interpolation, sink/reservoir, absolute temperature, open/closed system, intensive/extensive
property, subcooled, saturated, superheated.
4. Explain the advantages and limitations of the ideal gas model.
5. Sketch and interpret paths on a P-Vdiagram.
6. Perform steam table computations like quality determination, double interpolation.

To these, we could add expressing and explaining the first and second laws. Make a quick list of these expressions and explanations in your own words, including cartoons or illustrations as you see fit,  starting with the first and second laws.

01.5 Real Fluids and Tabulated Properties Click here. 100 2

Double interpolation (uakron, 8min) is exactly what it sounds like: to find a steam property when neither the pressure nor temperature are among the tabulated values, you need to interpolate twice. We interpolate first on pressure, then on temperature. It is a bit tedious, but straightforward.

Comprehension Questions:
1. Describe how you would use double interpolation to obtain H if given T=275 C and P=0.45MPa.
2. Describe how you would use double interpolation to obtain H if given T=275 C and V=0.555m3/kg.

05.4 - Refrigeration Click here. 100 2

Refrigeration Cycle Introduction (LearnChemE.com, 3min) explains each step in an ordinary vapor compression (OVC) refrigeration cycle and the energy balance for the step. You might also enjoy the more classical introduction (USAF, 11min) representing your tax dollars at work. The musical introduction is quite impressive and several common misconceptions are addressed near the end of the video.
Comprehension Questions: Assume zero subcooling and superheating in the condenser and evaporator.
1. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. Why is the condenser temperature higher than than the evaporator temperature? Shouldn't it be the other way around? Explain.
2. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using the table in Appendix E-12.
3. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using the chart in Appendix E-12.
4. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using Eqn 2.47.
5. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. Assume the compressor of the OVC cycle is adiabatic and reversible. What two variables (P,V,T,U,H,S) determine the state at the outlet of the compressor?

10.06 - Relating VLE to Distillation Click here. 100 1

Distillation is the primary choice for separations in the petrochemical industry. Because the majority of chemical processing involves separations/purifications, that makes distillation the biggest economic driver in all of chemical production. Therefore, it is very important for chemical engineers to understand how distillation works (21min, uakron.edu) and how VLE plays the major role. This video is a bit long, but it puts into context how phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties relate to very important practical applications. You may find it helpful to reinforce the conceptual video with some sample calculations.(12min) At the end of the video, you should be able to answer the following:

Consider the acetone+ethanol system. Use SCVP (Eqn 2.47) to answer the following.

  1. Sketch a Txy diagram for acetone+ethanol at 1 bar with accurate Tsat's. Label completely.
  2. Which component pertaining to #1 would have enhanced concentration in the distillate?
  3. Accurately sketch the yx diagram pertaining to #1
  4. Use Raoult's Law to estimate αLH pertaining to #1.
  5. Use your sketch from 3 to estimate Nmin  to go from x1=0.1 to 0.9.
  6. Use the Fenske equation to estimate Nmin  with splits of 0.9 and 0.1.

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