Top-rated ScreenCasts

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14.10 Solid-liquid Equilibria Click here. 100 2

Solid-liquid Equilibria using Excel (7:38min, msu)

The strategy for solving SLE is discussed and an example generating a couple points from Figure 14.12 of the text are performed. Most of the concepts are not unique to UNIFAC or Excel. This screeencast shows how to use the solver tool to find solubility at at given temperature.

14.09 - Numerical procedures for binary, ternary LLE Click here. 100 1

LLE flash using Matlab/Chap14/LLEflash.m (5:54) (msu.edu)

An overview of the LLE flash routine in Matlab, including an overview of the program logic and then an example of how to run the program.

See also - Supplement on Iteration of LLE with Excel and Matlab.

10.07 - Nonideal Systems Click here. 100 1

Nonideal Mixtures (4:58) (msu.edu)

Raoult's law is an easy way to calculate VLE, but it is inaccurate for most detailed VLE calculations. This screencast provides an overview of the problems, and introduces the concept of an azeotrope. The VLE K-ratio is shown to be less than one or greater than one dependenting on the overall system concentration relative to the azeotrope composition where K=1. The concept of positive and negative deviations is introduced.

07.02 Corresponding States Click here. 100 1

Principles of Corresponding States (10:02) (msu.edu)
An overview of use of Tc and Pc and acentric factor to create corresponding states correlation. The relation between acentric factor and deviations from spherical fluids is highlighted.

Comprehension Questions:

1. What is the value of the reduced vapor pressure for Krypton at a reduced temperature of 0.7? How does this help us to characterize the vapor pressure curve?

2. Sketch the graph of vapor pressure vs. temperature as presented in this screencast for the compounds: Krypton and Ethanol. Be sure to label your axes completely and accurately. Draw a vertical line to indicate the condition that defines the acentric factor.

05.2 - The Rankine cycle Click here. 100 1

Rankine Cycle Introduction (LearnChemE.com, 4min) The Carnot cycle becomes impractical for common large scale application, primarily because H2O is the most convenient working fluid for such a process. When working with H2O, an isentropic turbine could easily take you from a superheated region to a low quality steam condition, essentially forming large rain drops. To understand how this might be undesirable, imagine yourself riding through a heavy rain storm at 60 mph with your head outside the window. Now imagine doing it 24/7/365 for 10 years; that's how long a high-precision, maximally efficient turbine should operate to recover its price of investment. Next you might ask why not use a different working fluid that does not condense, like air or CO2. The main problem is that the heat transfer coefficients of gases like these are about 40 times smaller that those for boiling and condensing H2O. That means that the heat exchangers would need to be roughly 40 times larger. As it is now, the cooling tower of a nuclear power plant is the main thing that you see on the horizon when approaching from far away. If that heat exchanger was 40 times larger... that would be large. And then we would need a similar one for the nuclear core. Power cycles based on heating gases do exist, but they are for relatively small power generators.
     With this background, it may be helpful to review the relation between the Carnot and Rankine cycles. (LearnChemE.com, 6min) The Carnot cycle is an idealized conceptual process in the sense that it provides the maximum possible fractional conversion of heat into work (aka. thermal efficiency, ηθ).
Comprehension Questions:
1. Why is the Carnot cycle impractical when it comes to running steam through a turbine? How does the Rankine cycle solve this problem?
2. Why is the Carnot cycle impractical when it comes to running steam through a pump? How does the Rankine cycle solve this problem?
3. It is obvious which temperatures are the "high" and "low" temperatures in the Carnot cycle, but not so much in the Rankine cycle. The "boiler" in a Rankine cycle actually consists of "simple boiling" where the saturated liquid is converted to saturated vapor, and superheating where the saturated vapor is raised to the temperature entering the turbine. When comparing the thermal efficiency of a Rankine cycle to the Carnot efficiency, should we substitute the temperature during "simple" boiling, or the temperature entering the turbine into the formula for the Carnot efficiency? Explain.

11.02 - Calculations with Activity Coefficients Click here. 100 2

This example shows how to incorporate activity calculations into Excel for solutions that follow the Margules 1-parameter (M1) model.(9min, uakron.edu)

You should be able to adapt this procedure along with the procedure for the multicomponent ideal solutions to create a multicomponent M1 model. If you are having trouble, the video for the multicomponent SSCED model illustrates a very similar procedure. You can check your answers by putting in the same component twice. For example, instead of an equimolar binary mixture, input a quaternary mixture with 0.25 moles of methanol, 0.25 methanol (ie. type it as if it was another component), 0.25 of benzene and 0.25 of benzene. If you don't get the same results as for the binary equimolar system, check your calculations.Note: This is a companion file in a series. You may wish to choose your own order for viewing them. For example, you should implement the first three videos before implementing this one. Also, you might like to see how to quickly visualize the Txy analog of the Pxy phase diagram. If you see a phase diagram like the ones in section 11.8, you might want to learn about LLE phase diagrams. The links on the software tutorial present a summary of the techniques to be implemented throughout Unit3 in a quick access format that is more compact than what is presented elsewhere. Some students may find it helpful to refer to this compact list when they find themselves "not being able to find the forest because of all the trees."

Comprehension Questions: Assume the SCVP model (Eq. 2.47).
1. Develop a Pxy diagram for the IPA+water system like Figure 10.8c, guessing values of A12 until you match the maximum pressure (azeotrope). What value of A12 did you find? (Hint: A12 is not the same as A12*RT.)
2. Develop a Pxy diagram for the acetone+chloroform system like Figure 10.9c, guessing values of A12 until you match the minimum pressure (azeotrope). What value of A12 did you find? (Hint: A12 is not the same as A12*RT.)
3. Develop a Pxy diagram for the acetone+acetic acid system like Figure 10.9a, guessing values of A12 until you match the pressure at x1=0.5 (305mmHg). What value of A12 did you find? (Hint: A12 is not the same as A12*RT.)

05.4 - Refrigeration Click here. 100 2

Refrigeration Cycle Introduction (LearnChemE.com, 3min) explains each step in an ordinary vapor compression (OVC) refrigeration cycle and the energy balance for the step. You might also enjoy the more classical introduction (USAF, 11min) representing your tax dollars at work. The musical introduction is quite impressive and several common misconceptions are addressed near the end of the video.
Comprehension Questions: Assume zero subcooling and superheating in the condenser and evaporator.
1. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. Why is the condenser temperature higher than than the evaporator temperature? Shouldn't it be the other way around? Explain.
2. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using the table in Appendix E-12.
3. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using the chart in Appendix E-12.
4. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. The operating fluid is R134a. Estimate the pressures in the condenser and evaporator using Eqn 2.47.
5. An OVC operates with 43 C in the condenser and -33 C in the evaporator. Assume the compressor of the OVC cycle is adiabatic and reversible. What two variables (P,V,T,U,H,S) determine the state at the outlet of the compressor?

08.07 - Implementation of Departure Functions Click here. 100 1

Derive the internal energy departure function (uakron.edu, 20min) for the following EOS:
P = (RT(1+V1.5)/V1.5)*(1+sqrt(V)) - a/(V^2T^1.3)/(1+sqrt(V)) This sample derivation is more complicated than average, but the usual procedure still works. We begin by rearranging to obtain an expression for Z and finding the Helmholtz departure, then differentiating to get the internal energy.

Comprehension: Given (A-Aig)TV/RT = -2ln(1-ηP) - 16.49ηPβε/[1-βε(1-2ηP)/(1+2ηP)^2 ]

1. Derive the internal energy departure function.

2. Derive the expression for the compressibility factor.

3. Solve the EOS for Zc.

09.04 - Changes in Gibbs Energy with Pressure Click here. 100 1

Gibbs Energy - Nuts to Soup. (learncheme.com, 8min) It is straightforward to start from the definition of Gibbs Energy and derive all the changes in Gibbs energy. These can be graphed for H2O to see how familiar quantities from the steam tables relate to changes in this unfamiliar property.

08.02 - The Internal Energy Departure Function Click here. 100 1

Departure Function Derivation Principles (8:03) (msu.edu)
This screencast covers sections 8.2 - 8.8. Concepts of using the equation of state to evaluate departure functions. The screencasts also discusses the choice of density integrals or pressure integrals. The use of a reference state is discussed.

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