Top-rated ScreenCasts

Text Section Link to original post Rating (out of 100) Number of votes Copy of rated post
05.2 - The Rankine cycle Click here. 100 1

Thermal Efficiency with a 1-Stage Rankine Cycle. (uakron.edu, 12min) Steam from a boiler enters a turbine at 350C and 1.2MPa and exits at 0.01MPa and saturated vapor; compute the thermal efficiency (ηθ) of the Rankine cycle based on this turbine. (Note that this is something quite different from the turbine's "expander" efficiency, ηE.) This kind of calculation is one of the elementary skills that should come out of any thermodynamics course. Try to pause the video often and work out the answer on your own whenever you think you can. You will learn much more about the kinds of mistakes you might make if you take your best shot, then use the video to check yourself. Then practice some more by picking out other boiler and condenser conditions and turbine efficiencies. FYI: the conditions of this problem should look familiar because they are the same as the turbine efficiency example in Chapter 4. That should make it easy for you to take your best shot.

Comprehension Questions:

1. The entropy balance is cited in this video, but never comes into play. Why not?

2. Steam from a boiler enters a turbine at 400C and 2.5 MPa and exits a 100% efficient turbine at 0.025MPa; compute the Rankine efficiency. Comment on the practicality of this process. (Hint: review Chapter 4 if you need help with turbine efficiency.)

17.07 - Temperature Dependence of Ka Click here. 100 2

Example 17.4 and 17.5 solved using Kcalc.xlsx (6:01) (msu.edu)

The full form of the temperature dependence of Ka is implemented in Kcalc.xlsx and Kcalc.m. This screecast covers the use of Kcalc.xlsx for Example 17.4 and Example 17.5 of the textbook.

Comprehension Questions:

1. CO and H2 are fed in a 2:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGRº and ΔHRº.
2. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGRº and ΔHRº.
3. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 600K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGRº and ΔHRº.
4. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate ΔGTº and ΔHTº. Check your answer for ΔGTº using the value given for Ka in Example 17.1.
5. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 600K and 10 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. Calculate Ka, ΔGTº and ΔHTº.
6. CH3OH is fed to a reactor at 200ºC and 1 bar with a catalyst that produces CO and H2. Calculate Ka, ΔGTº and ΔHTº for this reaction and compare to the literature values given in Example 17.6 of Section 17.10.
7. CH3OH is fed to a reactor at 300ºC and 1 bar with a catalyst that produces CO and H2. Calculate Ka for this reaction and compare to the value given in Example 17.6 of Section 17.10. Give two reasons why the two estimates are not identical.




17.07 - Temperature Dependence of Ka Click here. 100 2

You can customize Kcalc.xlsx (uakron.edu, 17min) to facilitate whatever calculations you may need to perform. This presentation shows how to implement VLOOKUP to automatically load the relevant Hf, Gf, and Cp values. It also shows how to automatically use the Cp/R value when a,b,c,d values for Cp are not available. Finally, it shows how a fairly general table of inlet flows, temperatures, and pressures can be used to set up the equilibrium conversion calculation. The initial set up is demonstrated for the dimethyl ether process, then revised to initiate solution of Example 17.9 for ammonia synthesis.

Comprehension Questions:

1. The video shows how the shortcut Van't Hof equation can be written as lnKa=A+B/T. What are the values of A and B for the dimethyl ether process when a reference temperature of 633K is used?
2. The video shows how the shortcut Van't Hof equation can be written as lnKa=A+B/T. What are the values of A and B for the ammonia synthesis process when a reference temperature of 600K is used?

10.02 - Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) Calculations Click here. 100 2

VLE Routines - General Strategies (4:49) (msu.edu)

Deciding which routine to use is more challenging than it appears. Also understanding the strategy used to solve the problems is extremely helpful in being able to develop the equations to solve instead of trying to memorize them.

17.06 Determining the Spontaneity of Reactions Click here. 100 1

Which way will a reaction go? (3:40) (msu.edu)

When both reactants and products are present in a reactng mixture, the direction the reaction will proceed is not necessarily indicated by the sign of ΔGo or Ka. Rather, it is determined by ΔG. This screencasts provides guidance for understanding this concept.

Comprehension Questions: (Hint: review Example 17.1 before answering.)

1. CO and H2 are fed in a 2:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of H2 is 32%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?
2. CO and H2 are fed in a 2:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of CO is 52%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?
3. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of H2 is 42%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?
4. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of H2 is 42%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?

02.01 Expansion/Contraction Work Click here. 100 2

Vocabulary in Sections 2.1-2.3: Forms of "Work." (uakron.edu, 11 min) Making cookies is hard work. In discussing work, we develop several shorthand terms to refer to specific common situations: expansion-contraction work, shaft work, flow work, stirring work, "lost" work. These terms comprise the headings of sections 2.1-2.3, but it is convenient to discuss them all at once. The important thing to remember is that work is really just force times distance, pure and simple. The shorthand terms are not intended to complicate the discussion, but to expedite the analysis of the energy balance. Developing some familiarity with the terms related to common daily experiences may help you to assimilate this new vocabulary. Sample calculations (13min) illustrate a remarkable difference when one is faced with gas compression vs. liquid pump work. 

Comprehension Questions:
1. How is "expansion-contraction" work related to force times distance?
2. What is the expression for "flow" work? Explain how it relates to force times distance for fluid flowing in a pipe.
3. What expression can we use for calculating "shaft" work, as in a pump or turbine? What is the technique of calculus to which it is related?

13.04 - UNIQUAC Click here. 100 2

Volumes and Areas from Group Contributions (3:04)

Group contributions are used widely in property prediction. The volumes and surface areas have been determined by x-ray data and high-temperature collision data. The UNIQUAC and UNIFAC activity coefficient methods use these quantities to calculation volume fractions and surface area fractions. The assignment of functional groups for a molecule must be done carefully to assure agreement with the groups used by the model developers.

Comprehension Questions:

1. Estimate R and Q for 1,4 dihydroxy benzene.

2. Estimate R and Q for n-propyl alcohol and compare them to the values for IPA.

3. Estimate R and Q for methyl-npropyl ketone.

07.11 - The molecular basis of equations of state: analytical theories Click here. 100 1

Nature of Molecular Parking Lots - RDFs(20min, uakron.edu) Molecules occupy space and they move around until they find their equilibrium pressure at a given density and temperature. Cars in a parking lot behave in a similar fashion except the parking lot is in 2D vs. 3D. Despite this exception, we can understand a lot about molecular distributions by thinking about how repulsive and attractive forces affect car parking. For example, one important consideration is that you should not expect to see two cars parked in the same space at the same time! That's entirely analogous for molecular parking. Simple ideas like this lead to an intuitive understanding of the number of molecules distributed at each distance around a central molecule. From there, it is straightforward to multiply the energy at a given distance (ie. u(r) ) by the number of molecules at that distance (aka. g(r) ), and integrate to obtain the total energy. A similar integral over intermolecular forces leads to the pressure. And, voila! we have a new conceptual route to developing engineering equations of state.
Comprehension questions:
1. Sketch u(r)/epsilon and g(r) vs. r/sigma for square well spheres at a very low density. Use a solid line for g(r) and a dashed line for u(r)/epsilon.
2. Sketch u(r)/epsilon and g(r) vs. r/sigma for hard spheres at a high density. Use a solid line for g(r) and a dashed line for u(r)/epsilon.
3. Sketch u(r)/epsilon and g(r) vs. r/sigma for square well spheres at a high density. Use a solid line for g(r) and a dashed line for u(r)/epsilon.

17.05 - Effect of Pressure, Inerts, Feed Ratios Click here. 100 1

How to push, pull, persuade a reaction (3:32) (msu.edu)

Pressure can be used to influence conversion for reactions where gas phase species are present. Feed ratios, inerts, or simultaneous reactions can also be used.

Comprehension Questions:

1. The principle by which a change in temperature, pressure, or concentration leads to a counteracting change in equilibrium is known as:_____.
2. For the reaction: CO + 2H2 = CH3OH, an increase in pressure will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain.
2. For the reaction: CH4 + H2O = CO + 3H2, an increase in pressure will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain. (FYI: this reaction, known as "steam reforming" is an important step in making chemicals from natural gas.)
3. For the reaction: CO + 2H2 = CH3OH, adding an inert component will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain.
4. We discuss temperature effects in detail later, but for now you should be able to make predictions based on ____ principle (cf. #1 above). An exothermic reaction gives off heat. Therefore, adding heat to an exothermic reaction (ie. raising the temperature) will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain.
5. For the reaction: H2O + CO = H2 + CO2, an increase in pressure will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain. (As a first approximation, you may neglect deviations from ideal gas behavior, but then discuss the effect these deviations would have if you did take them into account. Which component's fugacity would be most affected by these deviations and how do these deviations change with pressure?)
6. For the reaction: coal + H2O = CO + H2, an increase in pressure will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain. (Hint: carbon in the form of coal is solid and does not exist in the vapor phase. cf. section 17.14. It might be helpful to think of the reverse reaction, known as coking, where the solid carbon precipitates from the gas. This is a very simple example of simultaneous reaction and phase equilibrium.)
7. For the reaction: CO + 2H2 = CH3OH, adding an inert liquid to the reactor through which all products are removed will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain. (Hint: this is a bit more sophisticated example of simultaneous reaction and phase equilibrium. How will the inert liquid alter the concentrations in the vapor? Remember that the fugacities are proportional to the gaseous partial pressures.)


08.02 - The Internal Energy Departure Function Click here. 100 1

Departure Function Derivation Principles (8:03) (msu.edu)
This screencast covers sections 8.2 - 8.8. Concepts of using the equation of state to evaluate departure functions. The screencasts also discusses the choice of density integrals or pressure integrals. The use of a reference state is discussed.

Pages