Top-rated ScreenCasts

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09.04 - Changes in Gibbs Energy with Pressure Click here. 100 1

Gibbs Energy - Nuts to Soup. (learncheme.com, 8min) It is straightforward to start from the definition of Gibbs Energy and derive all the changes in Gibbs energy. These can be graphed for H2O to see how familiar quantities from the steam tables relate to changes in this unfamiliar property.

17.06 Determining the Spontaneity of Reactions Click here. 100 1

Which way will a reaction go? (3:40) (msu.edu)

When both reactants and products are present in a reactng mixture, the direction the reaction will proceed is not necessarily indicated by the sign of ΔGo or Ka. Rather, it is determined by ΔG. This screencasts provides guidance for understanding this concept.

Comprehension Questions: (Hint: review Example 17.1 before answering.)

1. CO and H2 are fed in a 2:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of H2 is 32%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?
2. CO and H2 are fed in a 2:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of CO is 52%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?
3. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of H2 is 42%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?
4. CO and H2 are fed in a 1:1 ratio to a reactor at 500K and 20 bars with a catalyst that favors only CH3OH as its product. When the conversion of H2 is 42%, will the reaction go forwards towards product or back to reactants?

17.05 - Effect of Pressure, Inerts, Feed Ratios Click here. 100 1

How to push, pull, persuade a reaction (3:32) (msu.edu)

Pressure can be used to influence conversion for reactions where gas phase species are present. Feed ratios, inerts, or simultaneous reactions can also be used.

Comprehension Questions:

1. The principle by which a change in temperature, pressure, or concentration leads to a counteracting change in equilibrium is known as:_____.
2. For the reaction: CO + 2H2 = CH3OH, an increase in pressure will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain.
2. For the reaction: CH4 + H2O = CO + 3H2, an increase in pressure will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain. (FYI: this reaction, known as "steam reforming" is an important step in making chemicals from natural gas.)
3. For the reaction: CO + 2H2 = CH3OH, adding an inert component will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain.
4. We discuss temperature effects in detail later, but for now you should be able to make predictions based on ____ principle (cf. #1 above). An exothermic reaction gives off heat. Therefore, adding heat to an exothermic reaction (ie. raising the temperature) will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain.
5. For the reaction: H2O + CO = H2 + CO2, an increase in pressure will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain. (As a first approximation, you may neglect deviations from ideal gas behavior, but then discuss the effect these deviations would have if you did take them into account. Which component's fugacity would be most affected by these deviations and how do these deviations change with pressure?)
6. For the reaction: coal + H2O = CO + H2, an increase in pressure will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain. (Hint: carbon in the form of coal is solid and does not exist in the vapor phase. cf. section 17.14. It might be helpful to think of the reverse reaction, known as coking, where the solid carbon precipitates from the gas. This is a very simple example of simultaneous reaction and phase equilibrium.)
7. For the reaction: CO + 2H2 = CH3OH, adding an inert liquid to the reactor through which all products are removed will cause the products to: ___ (decrease, increase, or be unaffected). Explain. (Hint: this is a bit more sophisticated example of simultaneous reaction and phase equilibrium. How will the inert liquid alter the concentrations in the vapor? Remember that the fugacities are proportional to the gaseous partial pressures.)


09.05 - Fugacity and Fugacity Coefficient Click here. 100 1

In a contest for "the most hated word in Chemical Engineering," fugacity won by a landslide. This video (15min, uakron.edu) reviews how the term was developed and why it's not really as bad as all that. In fact, it's a nice word that sets the stage for all of phase and reaction equilibrium with a straightforward extension of the same conceptual basis to mixtures. On second thought, perhaps the power of that conceptual basis and all that it implies is what really intimidates new students. Many perspectives have been offered to help overcome the frustration that students feel toward fugacity. If you like a comic book perspective, even that is available.

Comprehension Questions:

1.What is the fugacity of a vapor phase component in a mixture according to Raoult's law?
2.What is the fugacity of a liquid phase component in a mixture according to Raoult's law?
3. What word is modern usage is closely related to the latin root "fuga-"?
4. Water is in VLE at 0.7 bars in a fixed volume vessel. Five cm3 of air are injected into the vessel and the temperature is allowed to return to its original value. Does the water in the vapor phase increase, decrease, or remain the same? (Learncheme.com, 2min) (Hint: you may assume that air does not dissolve in the liquid water and the pressure is sufficiently low that the vapor can be assumed to behave as an ideal gas.)

07.11 - The molecular basis of equations of state: analytical theories Click here. 100 1

Nature of Molecular Parking Lots - RDFs(20min, uakron.edu) Molecules occupy space and they move around until they find their equilibrium pressure at a given density and temperature. Cars in a parking lot behave in a similar fashion except the parking lot is in 2D vs. 3D. Despite this exception, we can understand a lot about molecular distributions by thinking about how repulsive and attractive forces affect car parking. For example, one important consideration is that you should not expect to see two cars parked in the same space at the same time! That's entirely analogous for molecular parking. Simple ideas like this lead to an intuitive understanding of the number of molecules distributed at each distance around a central molecule. From there, it is straightforward to multiply the energy at a given distance (ie. u(r) ) by the number of molecules at that distance (aka. g(r) ), and integrate to obtain the total energy. A similar integral over intermolecular forces leads to the pressure. And, voila! we have a new conceptual route to developing engineering equations of state.
Comprehension questions:
1. Sketch u(r)/epsilon and g(r) vs. r/sigma for square well spheres at a very low density. Use a solid line for g(r) and a dashed line for u(r)/epsilon.
2. Sketch u(r)/epsilon and g(r) vs. r/sigma for hard spheres at a high density. Use a solid line for g(r) and a dashed line for u(r)/epsilon.
3. Sketch u(r)/epsilon and g(r) vs. r/sigma for square well spheres at a high density. Use a solid line for g(r) and a dashed line for u(r)/epsilon.

07.11 - The molecular basis of equations of state: analytical theories Click here. 100 1

Nature of Molecular Energy - Example Calculation(8min, uakron.edu) Given an estimate for the radial distribution function (RDF) integrate to obtain an estimate of the internal energy. The result provides an alternative to the attractive term of the vdW EOS.

13.04 - UNIQUAC Click here. 100 2

Volumes and Areas from Group Contributions (3:04)

Group contributions are used widely in property prediction. The volumes and surface areas have been determined by x-ray data and high-temperature collision data. The UNIQUAC and UNIFAC activity coefficient methods use these quantities to calculation volume fractions and surface area fractions. The assignment of functional groups for a molecule must be done carefully to assure agreement with the groups used by the model developers.

Comprehension Questions:

1. Estimate R and Q for 1,4 dihydroxy benzene.

2. Estimate R and Q for n-propyl alcohol and compare them to the values for IPA.

3. Estimate R and Q for methyl-npropyl ketone.

07.02 Corresponding States Click here. 100 1

Principles of Corresponding States (10:02) (msu.edu)
An overview of use of Tc and Pc and acentric factor to create corresponding states correlation. The relation between acentric factor and deviations from spherical fluids is highlighted.

Comprehension Questions:

1. What is the value of the reduced vapor pressure for Krypton at a reduced temperature of 0.7? How does this help us to characterize the vapor pressure curve?

2. Sketch the graph of vapor pressure vs. temperature as presented in this screencast for the compounds: Krypton and Ethanol. Be sure to label your axes completely and accurately. Draw a vertical line to indicate the condition that defines the acentric factor.

17.07 - Temperature Dependence of Ka Click here. 100 2

You can customize Kcalc.xlsx (uakron.edu, 17min) to facilitate whatever calculations you may need to perform. This presentation shows how to implement VLOOKUP to automatically load the relevant Hf, Gf, and Cp values. It also shows how to automatically use the Cp/R value when a,b,c,d values for Cp are not available. Finally, it shows how a fairly general table of inlet flows, temperatures, and pressures can be used to set up the equilibrium conversion calculation. The initial set up is demonstrated for the dimethyl ether process, then revised to initiate solution of Example 17.9 for ammonia synthesis.

Comprehension Questions:

1. The video shows how the shortcut Van't Hof equation can be written as lnKa=A+B/T. What are the values of A and B for the dimethyl ether process when a reference temperature of 633K is used?
2. The video shows how the shortcut Van't Hof equation can be written as lnKa=A+B/T. What are the values of A and B for the ammonia synthesis process when a reference temperature of 600K is used?

08.02 - The Internal Energy Departure Function Click here. 100 1

Departure Function Derivation Principles (8:03) (msu.edu)
This screencast covers sections 8.2 - 8.8. Concepts of using the equation of state to evaluate departure functions. The screencasts also discusses the choice of density integrals or pressure integrals. The use of a reference state is discussed.

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