Top-rated ScreenCasts

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11.13 - Osmotic Pressure Click here. 80 3

MW of protein by osmotic pressure - (8:23) (learncheme.com)

An application of osmotic pressure measurement to determine MW of a protein.

12.07 Multicomponent Extensions of van Der Waals' Models Click here. 80 1

M1/MAB Extension of the Multicomponent Flash Spreadsheet (19min, uakron.edu) adapted from Ideal Solutions (cf Section 10.4)

Shows how to modify the spreadsheet created for Ideal Solutions (Section 10.4) to apply modified Raoult's law for 5 components using the M1/MAB model.

Note: This is a companion file in a series. You may wish to choose your own order for viewing them. For example, you should implement the first three videos before implementing this one. Also, you might like to see how to quickly visualize the Txy analog of the Pxy phase diagram. If you see a phase diagram like the ones in section 11.8, you might want to learn about LLE phase diagrams. The links on the software tutorial present a summary of the techniques to be implemented throughout Unit3 in a quick access format that is more compact than what is presented elsewhere. Some students may find it helpful to refer to this compact list when they find themselves "not being able to find the forest because of all the trees."

Comprehension Questions:
1. Find the bubble and dew pressures of an equimolar mixture of chloroform, acetone, and ethanol at 5 bars using the MAB model. Then compute V/F x and y at the pressure that is halfway between dew and bubble. Is it what you expected?
2. Find the bubble and dew pressures of an equimolar mixture of acetone, ethanol, and methane at 5 bars using the MAB model. Then compute V/F x and y at the pressure that is halfway between dew and bubble. Is it what you expected?
3. Find the bubble and dew pressures of an equimolar mixture of chloroform, acetone, and ethanol at 5 bars using the MAB model. Then compute V/F x and y at the pressure that is halfway between dew and bubble. Is it what you expected?
4. Find the bubble and dew pressures of an equimolar mixture of acetone, ethanol, and methane at 5 bars using the MAB model. Then compute V/F x and y at the pressure that is halfway between dew and bubble. Is it what you expected?

09.05 - Fugacity and Fugacity Coefficient Click here. 80 2

What is fugacity? (10min) (learncheme.com) Defines fugacity in terms of Gibbs Energy and describes the need for defining this new property as a generalization of how pressure affects ideal gases.
Comprehension Questions
1. The phases in this video start with concentrations 0.0007kg/L and 1.0 kg/L, when not at equilibrium. What are the equilibrium concentrations?
2. Why is concentration an unreliable indicator for the direction of mass transfer?
3. Name two indicators for the direction of mass transfer that are superior to concentration.  

13.03 - NTRL Click here. 80 1

NRTL concepts (2:30) (msu.edu)

The concepts on the development of the NRTL activity coefficient model.

Comprehension Questions:

1. What value does the NRTL model assume for the coordination number (z)?
2. What does the acronym "NRTL" stand for?
3. What is the relation between τ12, τ21, and A12 of the M1 model when α12=0?
4. The NRTL model has one more parameter than the Wilson model. Which parameter is it and what is its default value?

09.05 - Fugacity and Fugacity Coefficient Click here. 80 2

In a contest for "the most hated word in Chemical Engineering," fugacity won by a landslide. This video (15min, uakron.edu) reviews how the term was developed and why it's not really as bad as all that. In fact, it's a nice word that sets the stage for all of phase and reaction equilibrium with a straightforward extension of the same conceptual basis to mixtures. On second thought, perhaps the power of that conceptual basis and all that it implies is what really intimidates new students. Many perspectives have been offered to help overcome the frustration that students feel toward fugacity. If you like a comic book perspective, even that is available.

Comprehension Questions:

1.What is the fugacity of a vapor phase component in a mixture according to Raoult's law?
2.What is the fugacity of a liquid phase component in a mixture according to Raoult's law?
3. What word is modern usage is closely related to the latin root "fuga-"?
4. Water is in VLE at 0.7 bars in a fixed volume vessel. Five cm3 of air are injected into the vessel and the temperature is allowed to return to its original value. Does the water in the vapor phase increase, decrease, or remain the same? (Learncheme.com, 2min) (Hint: you may assume that air does not dissolve in the liquid water and the pressure is sufficiently low that the vapor can be assumed to behave as an ideal gas.)

01.2 Molecular Nature of Temperature, Pressure, and Energy Click here. 76.75 80

Molecular Nature of Energy and Temperature (msu.edu) (3:34)
This introduction shows the connection with temperature and kinetic energy.  When applying Eqn. 1.1, you must be careful to keep your units straight, as illustrated in this sample calculation of the molecular temperature for xenon (Mw=131). (uakron, 5min).

Comprehension Questions:

1. A 1m3 vessel contains 0.5m3 of saturated liquid in equilibrium with 0.5 m3 of saturated vapor. Which molecules are moving slower? (a) the vapor (b) the liquid (c) they are all the same.

2. A glass of ice water is sitting in your freezer, set to 0C and fully equilibrated. Which molecules are moving slower? (a) the gas (b) the liquid (c) the solid (d) they are all the same.

3. You walk into the kitchen in the morning to get some breakfast. The ceiling fan is on. You forgot your slippers. Which one is "hotter?" (a) the floor (b) the ceiling (c) the granite counter top (d) the air in the room (e) they are all the same.

12.01 - The van der Waals Perspective for Mixtures Click here. 76.6667 6

Mixing Rules (7:23) (msu.edu)

How should energy depend on composition? Should it be linear or non-linear? What does the van der Waals approach tell us about composition dependence? This screencasts shows that the mixing rule for 'a' in a random mixture should be quadratic. A linear mixing rule is usually used for the van der Waals size parameter.

12.03 - Scatchard-Hildebrand Theory Click here. 74.5455 11

Scatchard-Hildebrand Theory (6:53) (msu.edu)

Have you ever heard 'Like dissolves like'? Here we see that numerically. The Scatchard-Hildebrand model builds on the van Laar equation by using pure component information. Scatchard and Hildebrand replaced the energy departure with the experimental energy of vaporization. Because this is related to the 'a' parameter in the van Laar theory, they developed a parameter called the 'solubility parameter', but based it on the energy of vaporization. Interestingly, the model reduces to the one parameter Margules equation when the molar volumes are the same.

Comprehension Questions:

1. Based on the Scatchard-Hildebrand  model, arrange the following mixtures from  most compatible to least compatible.  (a) Pentane+hexane,   (b) decane+decalin,  (c) 1-hexene+dodecanol,   (d) pyridine+methanol,
Most compatible                                                                     Least compatible

 _____                          ______                             ______                          ______

02.01 Expansion/Contraction Work Click here. 73.3333 3

Vocabulary in Sections 2.1-2.3: Forms of "Work." (uakron.edu, 11 min) Making cookies is hard work. In discussing work, we develop several shorthand terms to refer to specific common situations: expansion-contraction work, shaft work, flow work, stirring work, "lost" work. These terms comprise the headings of sections 2.1-2.3, but it is convenient to discuss them all at once. The important thing to remember is that work is really just force times distance, pure and simple. The shorthand terms are not intended to complicate the discussion, but to expedite the analysis of the energy balance. Developing some familiarity with the terms related to common daily experiences may help you to assimilate this new vocabulary. Sample calculations (13min) illustrate a remarkable difference when one is faced with gas compression vs. liquid pump work. 

Comprehension Questions:
1. How is "expansion-contraction" work related to force times distance?
2. What is the expression for "flow" work? Explain how it relates to force times distance for fluid flowing in a pipe.
3. What expression can we use for calculating "shaft" work, as in a pump or turbine? What is the technique of calculus to which it is related?

08.01 - The Departure Function Pathway Click here. 73.3333 6

Departure Function Overview (11:22) (msu.edu)
The philosophy and overall approach for using departure functions.

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