11.02 - Calculations with Activity Coefficients

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Dew Pressure (7:41) (msu.edu)

The culmination of the activity coefficient method is application of the fitted activity coefficients to extrapolate from limited experiments in a Stage III calculation. The recommended order of study is 1) Bubble Pressure; 2) Bubble Temperature; 3) Dew Pressure; 4) Dew Temperature. Note that an entire Pxy diagram can be generated with bubble pressure calculations; no dew calculations are required. However, many applications require dew calculations, so they cannot be avoided. The dew calculations are more complicated than bubble calculations, because the liquid activity coefficients are not known until the unknown liquid mole fractions are found. This screencast describes the procedure and how to implement the method in Matlab or Excel.

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Activity Coefficient Calculations in Matlab (6:12) (msu.edu)

An overview of the strategy of placing the activity coefficient models in a single folder, how the gammaModels .m files are used with scalars and vectors, and how to use the Matlab 'addpath' command to run the code from any folder on your computer.

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This example shows how to incorporate activity calculations into Excel for solutions that follow the Margules 1-parameter (M1) model.(9min, uakron.edu)

You should be able to adapt this procedure along with the procedure for the multicomponent ideal solutions to create a multicomponent M1 model. If you are having trouble, the video for the multicomponent SSCED model illustrates a very similar procedure. You can check your answers by putting in the same component twice. For example, instead of an equimolar binary mixture, input a quaternary mixture with 0.25 moles of methanol, 0.25 methanol (ie. type it as if it was another component), 0.25 of benzene and 0.25 of benzene. If you don't get the same results as for the binary equimolar system, check your calculations.Note: This is a companion file in a series. You may wish to choose your own order for viewing them. For example, you should implement the first three videos before implementing this one. Also, you might like to see how to quickly visualize the Txy analog of the Pxy phase diagram. If you see a phase diagram like the ones in section 11.8, you might want to learn about LLE phase diagrams. The links on the software tutorial present a summary of the techniques to be implemented throughout Unit3 in a quick access format that is more compact than what is presented elsewhere. Some students may find it helpful to refer to this compact list when they find themselves "not being able to find the forest because of all the trees."

Comprehension Questions: Assume the SCVP model (Eq. 2.47).
1. Develop a Pxy diagram for the IPA+water system like Figure 10.8c, guessing values of A12 until you match the maximum pressure (azeotrope). What value of A12 did you find? (Hint: A12 is not the same as A12*RT.)
2. Develop a Pxy diagram for the acetone+chloroform system like Figure 10.9c, guessing values of A12 until you match the minimum pressure (azeotrope). What value of A12 did you find? (Hint: A12 is not the same as A12*RT.)
3. Develop a Pxy diagram for the acetone+acetic acid system like Figure 10.9a, guessing values of A12 until you match the pressure at x1=0.5 (305mmHg). What value of A12 did you find? (Hint: A12 is not the same as A12*RT.)

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This example shows how to predict activity coefficients in Excel using the Margules Acid-Base (MAB) model.(8min, uakron.edu) Sometimes you just need a quick estimate of whether to suspect an azeotrope or LLE or some other anomalous behavior. If the MAB model indicates a possible problem, it's time to go to the library or the lab and validate your model with experimental data.

Note: This is a companion file in a series. You may wish to choose your own order for viewing them. For example, you should implement the first three videos before implementing this one. Also, you might like to see how to quickly visualize the Txy analog of the Pxy phase diagram. If you see a phase diagram like the ones in section 11.8, you might want to learn about LLE phase diagrams. The links on the software tutorial present a summary of the techniques to be implemented throughout Unit3 in a quick access format that is more compact than what is presented elsewhere. Some students may find it helpful to refer to this compact list when they find themselves "not being able to find the forest because of all the trees."

Comprehension Questions
1. Order the following binary systems from most compatible to least compatible according to the MAB model:
(Note: negative deviations from Raoult's law indicate greater "compatibility," although they may generate azeotropes.)
(a) ethanol+water (b) ethanol+benzene (c) ethanol+diethylamine (d) n-pentane+n-pentanol (e) n-hexane+benzene
2. Pick a couple of binary systems from the Korean Database (Hint: use Internet Explorer for KDB) and compare the experimental data to the MAB predictions. Refine your predicted M1 parameter by calling the solver to minimize the sum of squared deviations between the predicted and experimental pressures. If there was an azeotrope in one of your systems, did the MAB model miss it or was it qualitatively correct?

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This example shows how to quickly generate a Txy diagram in Excel using the Margules Acid-Base (MAB) model and the Excel solver.(14min, uakron.edu) It is a bit of a sneaky trick that sometimes needs good initial guesses, but it is a lot more convenient than solving for each temperature individually by trial and error.

Note: This is a companion file in a series. You may wish to choose your own order for viewing them. For example, you should implement the first three videos before implementing this one. Also, you might like to see how to quickly visualize the Txy analog of the Pxy phase diagram. If you see a phase diagram like the ones in section 11.8, you might want to learn about LLE phase diagrams. The links on the software tutorial present a summary of the techniques to be implemented throughout Unit3 in a quick access format that is more compact than what is presented elsewhere. Some students may find it helpful to refer to this compact list when they find themselves "not being able to find the forest because of all the trees."

Comprehension Questions
VLE data at constant pressure are much more relevant to distillation. Generate the Txy diagram for ethanol+benzene using the MAB model (a) at 1 bar (b) at 20 bars. Does the azeotrope change? How might you use these observations to "bust" the azeotrope and obtain pure ethanol and pure benzene? (Hint: use more than one distillation column?)

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Bubble Pressure (5:25) (msu.edu)

The culmination of the activity coefficient method is application of the fitted activity coefficients to extrapolate from limited experiments in a Stage III calculation. As the easiest routine to apply, the bubble pressure method should be studied first. The recommended order of study is 1) Bubble Pressure; 2) Bubble Temperature; 3) Dew Pressure; 4) Dew Temperature. Note that an entire Pxy diagram can be generated with bubble pressure calculations; no dew calculations are required.

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Dew Temperature (7:57) (msu.edu)

The culmination of the activity coefficient method is application of the fitted activity coefficients to extrapolate from limited experiments in a Stage III calculation. The recommended order of study is 1) Bubble Pressure; 2) Bubble Temperature; 3) Dew Pressure; 4) Dew Temperature. Note that an entire Txy diagram can be generated with bubble temperature calculations; no dew calculations are required. However, many applications require dew calculations, so they cannot be avoided. The dew calculations are more complicated than bubble calculations, because the liquid activity coefficients are not known until the unknown liquid mole fractions are found. This screencast describes the procedure and how to implement the method in Matlab or Excel.

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Bubble Temperature (2:43) (msu.edu)

The culmination of the activity coefficient method is application of the fitted activity coefficients to extrapolate from limited experiments in a Stage III calculation. The bubble temperature is the easiest after bubble pressure. The recommended order of study is 1) Bubble Pressure; 2) Bubble Temperature; 3) Dew Pressure; 4) Dew Temperature. Note that an entire Txy diagram can be generated with bubble temperature calculations; no dew calculations are required.

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