Top-rated ScreenCasts

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02.01 Expansion/Contraction Work Click here. 100 2

Vocabulary in Sections 2.1-2.3: Forms of "Work." (uakron.edu, 11 min) Making cookies is hard work. In discussing work, we develop several shorthand terms to refer to specific common situations: expansion-contraction work, shaft work, flow work, stirring work, "lost" work. These terms comprise the headings of sections 2.1-2.3, but it is convenient to discuss them all at once. The important thing to remember is that work is really just force times distance, pure and simple. The shorthand terms are not intended to complicate the discussion, but to expedite the analysis of the energy balance. Developing some familiarity with the terms related to common daily experiences may help you to assimilate this new vocabulary. Sample calculations (13min) illustrate a remarkable difference when one is faced with gas compression vs. liquid pump work. 

Comprehension Questions:
1. How is "expansion-contraction" work related to force times distance?
2. What is the expression for "flow" work? Explain how it relates to force times distance for fluid flowing in a pipe.
3. What expression can we use for calculating "shaft" work, as in a pump or turbine? What is the technique of calculus to which it is related?

04.09 Turbine calculations Click here. 100 2

Entropy Balances: Solving for Turbine Efficiency Sample Calculation. (uakron.edu, 10min) Steam turbines are very common in power generation cycles. Knowing how to compute the actual work, reversible work, and compare them is an elementary part of any engineering thermodynamics course.

Comprehension Questions:

1. An adiabatic turbine is supplied with steam at 2.0 MPa and 600°C and it exhausts at 98% quality and 24°C. (a) Compute the work output per kg of steam.(b) Compute the efficiency of the turbine.

2. A Rankine cycle operates on steam exiting the boiler at 7 MPa and 550°C and expanding to 60°C and 98% quality. Compute the efficiency of the turbine.

12.04 - The Flory-Huggins Model Click here. 100 2

The Flory and Flory-Huggins Models (7:05) (msu.edu)

Flory recognized the importance of molecular size on entropy, and the Flory equation is an important building block for many equations in Chapter 13. Flory introduced the importance of free volume. The Flory-Huggins model combines the Flory equation with the Scatchard-Hildebrand model using the degree of polymerization and the parameter χ. The Flory-Huggins model is used widely in the polymer industry.

Comprehension Questions:

Assume δP=δS for polystyrene, where δS is the solubility parameter for styrene. Also, polystyrene typically has a molecular weight of about 15,000. Room temperature is 25°C.

1. Estimate the infinite dilution activity coefficient of styrene in polystyrene.
2. Estimate the infinite dilution activity coefficient of toluene in polystyrene.
3. Estimate the infinite dilution activity coefficient of acetone in polystyrene.
4. Which of the above would be the "best" solvent for polystyrene? Explain quantitatively.

11.02 - Calculations with Activity Coefficients Click here. 97.1429 7

Activity Coefficient Calculations in Matlab (6:12) (msu.edu)

An overview of the strategy of placing the activity coefficient models in a single folder, how the gammaModels .m files are used with scalars and vectors, and how to use the Matlab 'addpath' command to run the code from any folder on your computer.

10.01 - Introduction to Phase Diagrams Click here. 96 5

Introduction to Phase Behavior (9:37) (msu.edu)
Students tend to be distracted with the algorithms for bubble, dew, and flash, and often miss the important concepts of the relation of the calculations to the phase diagram. This screencast discusses the pure component endpoints, the trends in phase behavior at the bubble and dew conditions, and the qualitative relation between the P-x-y and T-x-y diagrams.

Comprehension Questions:

1. Referring to the Txy diagram on slide 3, estimate T, nature (ie. L,V, V+L, L+L), composition(s), and amount of the phase(s) for points: a, b. d, g.
2. Referring to the Txy diagram on slide 3, suppose we had T = 340K and zA = 0.40. Estimate T, nature (ie. L,V, V+L, L+L), composition(s), and amount of the phase(s) for that point.
3. Which component is more volatile, A or B?

11.02 - Calculations with Activity Coefficients Click here. 96 5

Dew Temperature (7:57) (msu.edu)

The culmination of the activity coefficient method is application of the fitted activity coefficients to extrapolate from limited experiments in a Stage III calculation. The recommended order of study is 1) Bubble Pressure; 2) Bubble Temperature; 3) Dew Pressure; 4) Dew Temperature. Note that an entire Txy diagram can be generated with bubble temperature calculations; no dew calculations are required. However, many applications require dew calculations, so they cannot be avoided. The dew calculations are more complicated than bubble calculations, because the liquid activity coefficients are not known until the unknown liquid mole fractions are found. This screencast describes the procedure and how to implement the method in Matlab or Excel.

01.2 Molecular Nature of Temperature, Pressure, and Energy Click here. 95 8

Molecular Nature of Energy, Temperature, and Pressure By Etomica(uakron.edu, 17min). We can use a free website (Etomica.org) to visualize the ways that molecules interact, resulting in the average properties that we see at the macroscopic level. The oversimplified nature of the ideal gas model becomes really obvious and the improvement of the hard sphere model is easily understood. Including both attractive and repulsive forces, as in the square well potential model, leads to more surprising behavior. The two effects may cancel and make the Z factor (Z=PV/RT) look like an ideal gas even though it is not. Also, the adiabatic transformation between potential energy and kinetic energy leads to spikes in temperature as molecules enter each other's attractive wells. In certain cases, you might see molecules get stuck in each others' wells. This is effectively "bonding." This bonding is limited at very low density because it requires a third interaction to occur during the collision in order to stay bonded. This requirement lies at the fundamental basis of what is known as "unimolecular reaction," a fairly advanced concept that is easily understood by watching the video.

Comprehension Questions:
1. What is the average temperature (K) illustrated in the screencast? Is it higher or lower than the initial temperature? Explain.
2. What is the average pressure (bar) illustrated in the screencast?
3. Go to the etomica.org website and perform your own simulation with the piston-cylinder applet starting with 100 molecules and assuming the square well poential model. You can run the simulation in fast mode, but let the molecules collide for 2500 ps. Then report the average value of T,P,U,Z. (Hint: compute Z from its definition, and be careful with units.)

14.10 Solid-liquid Equilibria Click here. 93.33329999999999 3

SLE using Excel with the M1 model (7min, uakron.edu)

Similar to LLE in Excel, the iteration feature can be used to quickly solve for SLE at multiple temperatures.

Comprehension Questions:
1. Estimate the solubility of naphthalene in benzene at 25C. (a) Use the ideal solution model. (b) Use the MAB model. (ANS. a. 0.306, b. 0.302)
2. Estimate the solubility of biphenyl in nhexane at 25C. (a) Use the ideal solution model. (b) Use the MAB model. 
3. Estimate the solubility of phenol in benzene at 25C. (a) Use the ideal solution model. (b) Use the MAB model. 

07.06 Solving The Cubic EOS for Z Click here. 93.33329999999999 3

1. Peng-Robinson PVT Properties - Excel (3:30) (msu.edu)

Introduction to PVT calculations using the Peng-Robinson workbook Preos.xlsx. Includes hints on changing the fluid and determining stable roots.

Comprehension Questions:

1. At 180K, what value of pressure gives you the minimum value for Z of methane? Hint: don't call solver.

2. At 30 bar, what value of pressure gives Z=0.95 for methane?

3. Compute the molar volume(s) (cm3/mol) for argon at 100K for each of the following?
(a) 3.000 bars (b) 4.000 bars (c) 3.26903 bars.

07.09 -The Molecular Basis of Equations of State: Concepts and Notation Click here. 93.33329999999999 3

Nature of Molecular Interactions - Macro To Nano(8min). (uakron.edu) Instead of matching the critical point, we can use experimental data for density vs. temperature from NIST as a means of characterizing the attractive energy and repulsive volume. A plot of compressibility factor vs. reciprocal temperature exhibits fairly linear behavior in the liquid region. Matching the slope and intercept of this line characterizes two parameters. This characterization may be even more useful than using the critical point if you are more interested in liquid densities than the critical point. In a similar manner, you could derive an EOS based on square-well (SW) simulations and use the SW EOS to match the NIST data(11min), as shown in this sample calculation of the ε and σ values for the SW potential. In this lesson, we learn how to characterize the forces between individual atoms, which may seem quite unreal or impractical when you first encounter it. On the other hand, "nanotechnology" is a scientific discipline that explores how the manipulation of nanostructure is now quite real with very significant practical implications. "The world's smallest movie" shows dancing molecules, (IBM, 2min) demonstrating the reality of molecular manipulation, and the accompanying text explains some of the practical implications. Along similar lines, researchers at LLNL and CalTech have developed 3D printers that can display "voxels" (the 3D analog of pixels) of ~1nm3. That's around 10-100 atoms per voxel. Since 2013-14, chemical/materials engineers have been building nanostructures (TEDX, 13min) in the same way that civil engineers build infrastructure.
Comprehension Questions:
1. What does the y-intercept represent in a plot of compressibility factor vs. reciprocal temperature?
2. What parameter does the y-intercept help to characterize, b or ε?
3. What does the x-intercept represent in a plot of compressibility factor vs. reciprocal temperature?
4. What parameter does the x-intercept help to characterize, b or ε?
5. Apply the SW EOS given in the second video to the isochore at 16.1 mol/L. Do you get the same values for ε/k and σ? Explain.

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