Top-rated ScreenCasts

Text Section Link to original post Rating (out of 100) Number of votes Copy of rated post
01.5 Real Fluids and Tabulated Properties Click here. 100 2

Double interpolation (uakron, 8min) is exactly what it sounds like: to find a steam property when neither the pressure nor temperature are among the tabulated values, you need to interpolate twice. We interpolate first on pressure, then on temperature. It is a bit tedious, but straightforward.

Comprehension Questions:
1. Describe how you would use double interpolation to obtain H if given T=275 C and P=0.45MPa.
2. Describe how you would use double interpolation to obtain H if given T=275 C and V=0.555m3/kg.

12.04 - The Flory-Huggins Model Click here. 100 2

The Flory and Flory-Huggins Models (7:05) (msu.edu)

Flory recognized the importance of molecular size on entropy, and the Flory equation is an important building block for many equations in Chapter 13. Flory introduced the importance of free volume. The Flory-Huggins model combines the Flory equation with the Scatchard-Hildebrand model using the degree of polymerization and the parameter χ. The Flory-Huggins model is used widely in the polymer industry.

Comprehension Questions:

Assume δP=δS for polystyrene, where δS is the solubility parameter for styrene. Also, polystyrene typically has a molecular weight of about 15,000. Room temperature is 25°C.

1. Estimate the infinite dilution activity coefficient of styrene in polystyrene.
2. Estimate the infinite dilution activity coefficient of toluene in polystyrene.
3. Estimate the infinite dilution activity coefficient of acetone in polystyrene.
4. Which of the above would be the "best" solvent for polystyrene? Explain quantitatively.

05.2 - The Rankine cycle Click here. 100 1

Thermal Efficiency with a 1-Stage Rankine Cycle. (uakron.edu, 12min) Steam from a boiler enters a turbine at 350C and 1.2MPa and exits at 0.01MPa and saturated vapor; compute the thermal efficiency (ηθ) of the Rankine cycle based on this turbine. (Note that this is something quite different from the turbine's "expander" efficiency, ηE.) This kind of calculation is one of the elementary skills that should come out of any thermodynamics course. Try to pause the video often and work out the answer on your own whenever you think you can. You will learn much more about the kinds of mistakes you might make if you take your best shot, then use the video to check yourself. Then practice some more by picking out other boiler and condenser conditions and turbine efficiencies. FYI: the conditions of this problem should look familiar because they are the same as the turbine efficiency example in Chapter 4. That should make it easy for you to take your best shot.

Comprehension Questions:

1. The entropy balance is cited in this video, but never comes into play. Why not?

2. Steam from a boiler enters a turbine at 400C and 2.5 MPa and exits a 100% efficient turbine at 0.025MPa; compute the Rankine efficiency. Comment on the practicality of this process. (Hint: review Chapter 4 if you need help with turbine efficiency.)

10.07 - Nonideal Systems Click here. 100 1

Nonideal Mixtures (4:58) (msu.edu)

Raoult's law is an easy way to calculate VLE, but it is inaccurate for most detailed VLE calculations. This screencast provides an overview of the problems, and introduces the concept of an azeotrope. The VLE K-ratio is shown to be less than one or greater than one dependenting on the overall system concentration relative to the azeotrope composition where K=1. The concept of positive and negative deviations is introduced.

08.07 - Implementation of Departure Functions Click here. 100 1

Derive the internal energy departure function (uakron.edu, 20min) for the following EOS:
P = (RT(1+V1.5)/V1.5)*(1+sqrt(V)) - a/(V^2T^1.3)/(1+sqrt(V)) This sample derivation is more complicated than average, but the usual procedure still works. We begin by rearranging to obtain an expression for Z and finding the Helmholtz departure, then differentiating to get the internal energy.

Comprehension: Given (A-Aig)TV/RT = -2ln(1-ηP) - 16.49ηPβε/[1-βε(1-2ηP)/(1+2ηP)^2 ]

1. Derive the internal energy departure function.

2. Derive the expression for the compressibility factor.

3. Solve the EOS for Zc.

10.01 - Introduction to Phase Diagrams Click here. 96 5

Introduction to Phase Behavior (9:37) (msu.edu)
Students tend to be distracted with the algorithms for bubble, dew, and flash, and often miss the important concepts of the relation of the calculations to the phase diagram. This screencast discusses the pure component endpoints, the trends in phase behavior at the bubble and dew conditions, and the qualitative relation between the P-x-y and T-x-y diagrams.

Comprehension Questions:

1. Referring to the Txy diagram on slide 3, estimate T, nature (ie. L,V, V+L, L+L), composition(s), and amount of the phase(s) for points: a, b. d, g.
2. Referring to the Txy diagram on slide 3, suppose we had T = 340K and zA = 0.40. Estimate T, nature (ie. L,V, V+L, L+L), composition(s), and amount of the phase(s) for that point.
3. Which component is more volatile, A or B?

11.02 - Calculations with Activity Coefficients Click here. 96 5

Dew Temperature (7:57) (msu.edu)

The culmination of the activity coefficient method is application of the fitted activity coefficients to extrapolate from limited experiments in a Stage III calculation. The recommended order of study is 1) Bubble Pressure; 2) Bubble Temperature; 3) Dew Pressure; 4) Dew Temperature. Note that an entire Txy diagram can be generated with bubble temperature calculations; no dew calculations are required. However, many applications require dew calculations, so they cannot be avoided. The dew calculations are more complicated than bubble calculations, because the liquid activity coefficients are not known until the unknown liquid mole fractions are found. This screencast describes the procedure and how to implement the method in Matlab or Excel.

14.10 Solid-liquid Equilibria Click here. 93.3333 3

SLE using Excel with the M1 model (7min, uakron.edu)

Similar to LLE in Excel, the iteration feature can be used to quickly solve for SLE at multiple temperatures.

Comprehension Questions:
1. Estimate the solubility of naphthalene in benzene at 25C. (a) Use the ideal solution model. (b) Use the MAB model. (ANS. a. 0.306, b. 0.302)
2. Estimate the solubility of biphenyl in nhexane at 25C. (a) Use the ideal solution model. (b) Use the MAB model. 
3. Estimate the solubility of phenol in benzene at 25C. (a) Use the ideal solution model. (b) Use the MAB model. 

07.06 Solving The Cubic EOS for Z Click here. 93.3333 3

1. Peng-Robinson PVT Properties - Excel (3:30) (msu.edu)

Introduction to PVT calculations using the Peng-Robinson workbook Preos.xlsx. Includes hints on changing the fluid and determining stable roots.

Comprehension Questions:

1. At 180K, what value of pressure gives you the minimum value for Z of methane? Hint: don't call solver.

2. At 30 bar, what value of pressure gives Z=0.95 for methane?

3. Compute the molar volume(s) (cm3/mol) for argon at 100K for each of the following?
(a) 3.000 bars (b) 4.000 bars (c) 3.26903 bars.

07.09 -The Molecular Basis of Equations of State: Concepts and Notation Click here. 93.3333 3

Nature of Molecular Interactions - Macro To Nano(8min). (uakron.edu) Instead of matching the critical point, we can use experimental data for density vs. temperature from NIST as a means of characterizing the attractive energy and repulsive volume. A plot of compressibility factor vs. reciprocal temperature exhibits fairly linear behavior in the liquid region. Matching the slope and intercept of this line characterizes two parameters. This characterization may be even more useful than using the critical point if you are more interested in liquid densities than the critical point. In a similar manner, you could derive an EOS based on square-well (SW) simulations and use the SW EOS to match the NIST data(11min), as shown in this sample calculation of the ε and σ values for the SW potential. In this lesson, we learn how to characterize the forces between individual atoms, which may seem quite unreal or impractical when you first encounter it. On the other hand, "nanotechnology" is a scientific discipline that explores how the manipulation of nanostructure is now quite real with very significant practical implications. "The world's smallest movie" shows dancing molecules, (IBM, 2min) demonstrating the reality of molecular manipulation, and the accompanying text explains some of the practical implications. Along similar lines, researchers at LLNL and CalTech have developed 3D printers that can display "voxels" (the 3D analog of pixels) of ~1nm3. That's around 10-100 atoms per voxel. Since 2013-14, chemical/materials engineers have been building nanostructures (TEDX, 13min) in the same way that civil engineers build infrastructure.
Comprehension Questions:
1. What does the y-intercept represent in a plot of compressibility factor vs. reciprocal temperature?
2. What parameter does the y-intercept help to characterize, b or ε?
3. What does the x-intercept represent in a plot of compressibility factor vs. reciprocal temperature?
4. What parameter does the x-intercept help to characterize, b or ε?
5. Apply the SW EOS given in the second video to the isochore at 16.1 mol/L. Do you get the same values for ε/k and σ? Explain.

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