10.01 - Introduction to Phase Diagrams

Comments

Introduction to Phase Behavior (9:37) (msu.edu)
Students tend to be distracted with the algorithms for bubble, dew, and flash, and often miss the important concepts of the relation of the calculations to the phase diagram. This screencast discusses the pure component endpoints, the trends in phase behavior at the bubble and dew conditions, and the qualitative relation between the P-x-y and T-x-y diagrams.

Comprehension Questions:

1. Referring to the Txy diagram on slide 3, estimate T, nature (ie. L,V, V+L, L+L), composition(s), and amount of the phase(s) for points: a, b. d, g.
2. Referring to the Txy diagram on slide 3, suppose we had T = 340K and zA = 0.40. Estimate T, nature (ie. L,V, V+L, L+L), composition(s), and amount of the phase(s) for that point.
3. Which component is more volatile, A or B?

Enter your rating: 
Your rating: None
4.8
Average: 4.8 (5 votes)

Bubble, Dew, Flash Concepts and the Lever Rule (4:01) (msu.edu)

Understanding what is present (known) and not present (unkown) for a given state of a system will help you decide which routine to use. Notation is introduced for liquids, vapor, and overall compositions. Also, the lever rule concept is used throughout the chemical engineering curriculum, but it is important to see how to use compositions for the lever rule.

Comprehension Questions:

1. Which variables are fixed and which do you need to find in each of the following:
a. Bubble temperature
b. Bubble pressure
c. Dew temperature
d. Dew pressure
e. Isothermal flash
f. Adiabatic flash

Enter your rating: 
Your rating: None
4
Average: 4 (4 votes)